Circulaire 12

Dear Colleagues,

Please find below calls for papers, announcements for conferences, exhibitions, fellowships, and other opportunities.

CAA has just published their CFP for the 2013 conference that will take place February 13-16 in New York. Below we have identified two panels that might interest EPCAF members, but as you may note, neither deal specifically with European art after 1945.

The lack of visibility and presence of European postwar and contemporary art at this major international conference reinforces our determination to affiliate EPCAF with CAA. This would guarantee that scholars working on European art have a yearly opportunity to present their work to the larger community. We will be submitting the paperwork over the summer, with the goal of having the first EPCAF meeting at CAA 2014.

All our best for the end of the semester.

Sincerely,

Catherine Dossin & Victoria H.F. Scott

 
 


CONFERENCES: CALLS FOR PAPERS 

German Art since 1945 in Context

Due Date: April 20
Durham, North Carolina
October 17-20, 2012.
Since the Reunification, German art has been the subject of several reevaluations, but most studies tend to focus on the relationship between East and West Germany and the Cold War. Although it is difficult to escape this political and ideological framework and consider German art outside its relationships to the Soviet Union and the United States, scholars are beginning to reassess the significance of German art in its broader geographical and philosophical context. What were its connections to other national art scenes, particularly within Europe? Which historical events and social factors affected artists, beyond WWII and the ideological divide? Taking on these questions and others, our panel seeks to provide a comprehensive picture of postwar art in East and West Germany by placing artists production in a larger cultural and art historical perspective. We invite papers that consider any aspect of the visual arts in both Germanys since 1945. Proposals addressing German contributions to major postwar trends and practices, especially those that have not yet received the attention they deserve, are encouraged. Ultimately, our ambition is to bring together historians of German art to take stock of current scholarship, survey the field, and open up new avenues for future research.
For more information: Catherine Dossin, Purdue University, cdossin@purdue.edu  and Victoria H.F. Scott, Emory University, vscott4@emory.edu
Submission information at: http://www.secollegeart.org/annual-conference.html
 
 

Art in Three Crises: 30–70–Now

Due Date: April 20
Durham, North Carolina
October 17-20, 2012.
This panel proposes to consider art practices at three paradigmatic moments of financial and social crisis: the 1930s, the 1970s, and the present. By highlighting the intersection of art with economic conditions, we seek to uncover historical and theoretical relationships between culture and capital, and by addressing the repetition of certain artistic practices and gestures from the historical avant-garde to the neo-avant-garde to the present, we wish to examine relationships between these three periods. Our objective is to explore collisions between past and present artistic responses through the axe of art and economics. This panel takes its starting point from a series of seminars initiated by Brian Holmes during the fall 2011 at Mess Hall, Chicago, in conjunction with the Occupy movement. Extended economic crises punctuate the development and expansion of capitalism during the twentieth century, from the 1929 crash and subsequent depression to the 1971 eradication of the gold standard and 1973 oil embargo to the 2000 dot-com bubble burst and 2008 recession, and responses to these crises shape the subsequent years. We believe there are specific and revealing connections between these economic histories and those of art, and we invite presentations that probe such connections.
For more information: Ruth Erickson, University of Pennsylvania, Ruthee@sas.upenn.edu and Emilie Anne-Yvonne Luse, Duke University, Emilie.Luse@Duke.edu
Submission information at: http://www.secollegeart.org/annual-conference.html
 
 

Conflict, controversy, dissent: art as a disturbance
Deadline: Apr 22, 2012

Swiss Institute for Art Research (SIK-ISEA), Zurich
November 8 – 09, 2012
The conference aims to illuminate the various fields of conflict from the points of view of different disciplines and sharpen people’s awareness of the problems. It is primarily concerned with demonstrating the productive dimensions of conflicts and investigating dispute as a precondition for discourse and a constructive new consensus in art and in (academic) everyday art research. Case studies and theoretical discussions will be taken into equal account. It will focus not only on the history of art and architecture but also on legal, social and economic factors.
The conference will focus on the following fields of conflict:
•Art (history) / Architectural history vs. Justice
•Art criticism / Art and architectural history vs. Market
•Art history vs. History of art
•Art / Architecture vs. Society
Interested academics are invited to submit papers (max. 1 page) in German, French or English with a short CV per e-mail by 22 April 2012 to regula.kraehenbuehl@sik-isea.ch 30 minutes have been scheduled for each presentation. The organisers will pay a flat rate for travelling
and accommodation expenses depending on the sum total of grants received from third parties.
 
 

Topographisches Regulativ. Die Skulptur Projekte Muenster und ihr Archiv
Deadline: Jun 1, 2012

LWL-Landesmuseum Münster und Kunstakademie Münster
20. – 22.11.2012
Die 1977 von Klaus Bußmann und Kasper König begründeten Skulptur Projekte Münster zählen zu den international einflussreichsten Ausstellungen der Gegenwartskunst. Sie finden alle zehn Jahre statt und haben in ihrer 40-jährigen Geschichte umfangreiches und aufschlussreiches Quellenmaterial zur Entwicklung der zeitgenössischen Kunst hervorgebracht. Einzelne der temporären Werke wurden im Stadtraum erhalten, wie etwa die titellose Arbeit Donald Judds von 1977, die er selber als „topographisches Regulativ in Form von zwei Betonringen” beschrieben hat. Einblick in diese verschiedenen Entstehungsprozesse und Dokumentationen der Zeit gewährt das umfangreiche und noch nicht erschlossene Archiv der Skulptur Projekte des LWL-Landesmuseums in Münster. Hier haben sich zu allen, auch den nicht realisierten Projekten Briefe, Skizzen, Fotografien, Modelle und Filmaufnahmen erhalten. Die Tagung „Topographisches Regulativ. Die Skulptur Projekte Münster und ihr Archiv“ widmet sich dieser Geschichte der Kunst im öffentlichen Raum und ihrer theoretischen Neukonfiguration. Die Fragen, die sich im historischen Rückblick ergeben, können im weitesten Sinne an die Zusammenführung von Kunst und Öffentlichkeit im 20. Jahrhundert anknüpfen. Es sind daher nicht nur Forscherinnen und Forscher aus dem Bereich der Kunstgeschichte und Kunstwissenschaft, sondern auch aus den Bereichen der Kulturwissenschaft, Philosophie, Geschichte, Politikwissenschaft und anderen Gebieten eingeladen. Im Rahmen der Tagung werden das Skulptur Projekte-Archiv vom LWL-Landesmuseum vorgestellt sowie Künstler und Kuratoren in einer Podiumsdiskussion zur Thematik befragt.
Um Einreichung eines Vortragskonzepts im Umfang von maximal 300 Wörtern zusammen mit einem kurzen Lebenslauf wird bis zum 1. Juni 2012 gebeten.
Bitte senden Sie die Unterlagen an: bluemle.tutoren@gmx.de
 
 

Central Europe’s Others in Art and Visual Culture

Historians of German and Central European Art and Architecture
Deadline: May 4, 2012
CAA, New York, Feb. 13-16, 2012
From Charlemagne to Schengen, Central Europe’s borders have been hotly disputed. Equally fraught notions of Central European national and individual identity have been shaped through notions of race, ethnicity, nation, temporality, religion, gender, and sexuality. For this panel we seek new research on concepts of the Other and related ideas of insiders and outsiders in representations from any time period from the Middle Ages to the present. Contributors might address the influence of trade, crusades, colonialism, postcoloniality, or tourism. They may investigate how supranational constructs of ethnicity, gender, or sexuality were played out in relation to representations of nation or Volk. Panelists in this session could also explore challenges to established institutions and conventional power dynamics, or examine how visual materials enabled those considered marginal to engender agency through subcultures or other sites of resistance.
For more information: Elizabeth Otto, University at Buffalo, State University of New York; and Brett Van Hoesen, University of Nevada, Reno. Email: eotto@buffalo.edu and bvanhoesen@unr.edu
 
 

Abstraction and Totality
Deadline: May 4, 2012

CAA, New York, Feb. 13-16, 2012
This panel addresses the paradoxes of abstract art’s relationship to ideology in the early and middle twentieth century. It considers the shifting service of abstract practices to a totalizing politics—whether radical or reactionary, whether capitalist, fascist, or communist—and investigates the circumstances under which abstraction has operated as an ideal vehicle of state ideology or an ostensible recoil from its insidious reach. Along with specific histories in context, we aim to address the abiding perception that abstraction is inherently resistant to historical interpretation. We welcome papers from a spectrum of national and cultural cases, both within European and American settings, but also beyond that limited geographic frame, including work on individual artists or collectives as well as on a variety of media, including the plastic arts, architecture, and cinema.
For more information: Ara H. Merjian, Department of Italian Studies, New York University, and Anthony White, University of Melbourne, School of Culture and Communication. Email: merjian@nyu.edu and a.white@unimelb.edu.au
 
 

The Spaces of Arts: Thinking the National and Transnational in a Global Perspective 

Deadline: May, 15 2012
Purdue University
September 27-29, 2012
Is art history global enough to take up the challenge of cultural mixing, transnationalism, internationalization, and globalization, without neglecting cultural nationalisms and artistic territorialization processes, which are the fabric of our discipline? How do we understand the relationships between circulations, globalizations, and the production of ethnicity or nationality in the arts? What strategies can we develop, besides narration and description, to write a new history of the arts that escapes both historiographical nationalism and blind globalism, while paying due to the national and transnational dimensions of artistic creation?
In response to these questions the École normale supérieure in Paris (ENS-Ulm) and Béatrice Joyeux-Prunel launched a vast research project in 2009. The ambition was to study arts and letters in a socio-spatial perspective that takes into account the spatial turn of Social Sciences. The result is ARTLAS, a digital atlas of arts and literature history which combines spatial, social, cultural, and esthetic questionings, with a narrative/descriptive approach, and visualization techniques, including charts and maps created with GIS technologies (Geographic Information Service).
The reliance on a cartographic approach and multi-scale analysis grows from the conviction that we can transform the geohistorical reflections that Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann presented in Toward a Geography of Art (2004) into maps, and that the atlas model can contribute to meeting the challenge of global art history James Elkins exposed with Is Art History Global? (2006). Still, the format of ARTLAS is motivated by the conviction that we cannot separate the analysis of artistic circulations and globalization from the study of territorialization of artistic practices.
In order to present ARTLAS on the American continents and engage in a dialogue with American scholars, the ENS is teaming with Purdue University to organize a conference which will take place on September 27-29, 2012 at Purdue. We have invited Professor DaCosta Kaufmann and Professor Elkins to present their respective takes on a global art history and the use of maps as art historical tools, while philosopher Edward S. Casey will address the links between art and maps.
We are now inviting scholars, whose research is grounded in socio-spatial analysis and/or aims at meeting the daunting challenge of ubiquity in art history, to join the conversation and offer their perspectives. We welcome papers that explore the connection between the national and transnational in a global perspective for any object, period, and place in the history of arts and letters.
Please send inquiries and proposals of no more than 500 words, along with a short CV, to the conference organizers, Catherine Dossin (cdossin@purdue.edu) and Béatrice Joyeux-Prunel (beatrice.joyeux-prunel@ens.fr) before 15 May 2012.
For more information on the conference, see: http://www.spacesofarts.org
For more information on ARTLAS, see: http://artlas.ens.fr
 
 


CONFERENCES: ANNOUNCEMENTS 

British Art As International Art, 1851 to 1960
Postgraduate Symposium — The British Art Research Group

University Of East Anglia, Norwich, UK, April 20 – 21, 2012
Friday 20th and Saturday 21st April 2012
There has been two decades of vigorous interest in British art history, but up to now this has tended to assume a more or less unproblematic category of national identity and has not enquired closely into the elusive idea of ‘Britishness’. More recently, the concept of the transnational has proved to be a productive way for art historians in the 21st century to reflect not only on contemporary art, but also that of previous centuries. This graduate conference will address the extent to which these two approaches overlap in British art between 1851 and 1960, not only in terms of British artists working abroad and non-British artists adopting Britain as a base, but also in less tangible or previously unconsidered ways.
Between 1851 and 1960, Britain’s global position altered radically – from the early consolidation of British imperial power in the mid-nineteenth century, through two world wars, the rise of the US to the reassessment of Britain’s political and cultural position in the post-war world, against a background of increasingly porous national and cultural boundaries. In this context, British art’s relationship with ‘the international’ seems a pertinent topic to consider, particularly from our own, increasingly ‘transnational’ perspective. ‘Transnational’ and ‘international’ are problematic terms here – the former reflects our own, more fluid concept of nationhood in the 21st century, while the latter offers a clearer definition of how nations were considered between 1851 and 1960. But is it possible to study British art of this period from our ‘transnational’ viewpoint? Can we talk of British art as separate from Britain as a nation or nationality? If British art between 1851 and 1960 cannot be considered ‘transnational’ in our terms, nor wholly ‘British’, how can it be considered in ‘international terms’?

 
 


JOURNALS: ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Michael Fried, “Sala with Schiller: World, Form, and Play in Mixed Behavior

Nonsite.org
http://nonsite.org/article/sala-with-schiller-world-form-and-play-in-mixed-behavior
 
 


JOB ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Modern Art History, Ben-Gurion University, Israel

Deadline: 17 May 2012
The Arts Department at Ben-Gurion University in Israel seek to fill a full-time tenure track position in the field of modern art history (late 18th century to 20th century). The successful candidate must have a Ph.D. in art history, a demonstration of teaching experience, and an ability to teach in Hebrew.  Closing date of applications: 17 May 2012
Please send a letter of interest, curriculum vitae, philosophy of teaching, syllabi of 1-2 courses as well as three letters of recommendations to Daniel Unger, the department chair, at dannu@bgu.ac.il

 
 


FELLOWSHIP ANNOUNCEMENTS 

2012-2014 Stefan Engelhorn Curatorial Fellowship 

The Busch-Reisinger Museum/Harvard Art Museums
Application deadline: May 4, 2012
The Curatorial Fellowship Program at the Harvard Art Museums is designed to broaden the experience of persons embarking on professional and scholarly careers in art history who are considering the museum profession. The Fellow shares fully in the range of curatorial activities including acquisitions and documentation of the permanent collection, and in answering scholarly inquiries and general correspondence. The Fellow also undertakes a collections-related
project. The 2012-2014 Stefan Engelhorn Curatorial Fellowship project will concentrate on research, cataloging, and interpretive materials related to the permanent collection of the Busch-Reisinger Museum to be installed in the museum’s new facility at 32 Quincy Street. Applicants should have an interest in the art of German-speaking countries and related cultures of central and northern Europe in all media, as well as aspects of exhibition design and provenance research.
The Harvard Art Museums, with the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, is a major center for art historical research and training. Fellows engage in close study and analysis of objects and their institutional frameworks, as well as broader issues of museum practice and museology. The term of the fellowship in the Busch-Reisinger Museum is 22-months, beginning no later than September 4, 2012. Summer start date strongly preferred. The Museums are  currently undergoing a major renovation and access to the collection will be limited during this term. Basic Qualifications: M.A. and graduate training in art history or related field.
 
 

2012-2014 Renke B. and Pamela M. Thye Curatorial Fellowship 

The Busch-Reisinger Museum/Harvard Art Museums
Application deadline: May 4, 2012
The Curatorial Fellowship Program at the Harvard Art Museums is designed to broaden the experience of persons embarking on professional and scholarly careers in art history who are considering the museum profession. The Fellow shares fully in the range of curatorial activities including acquisitions and documentation of the permanent collection, and in answering scholarly inquiries and general correspondence. The Fellow also undertakes a collections-related
project. The 2012-2014 Renke B. and Pamela M. Thye Curatorial Fellowship project will focus on the Busch-Reisinger Museum’s extensive holdings of multiples by Joseph Beuys. In addition to completing cataloging research and interpretive materials, the Fellow will explore broader questions related to the nature of these objects and offer insight into their care and display in the museum’s new building at 32 Quincy Street. The Renke B. and Pamela M. Thye Fellow will work collaboratively with a fellow appointed concurrently at the Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich. Applicants should have a strong interest in the work of Joseph Beuys and the multiple as an art form.
The Harvard Art Museums, with the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, is a major center for art historical research and training. Fellows engage in close study and analysis of objects and their institutional frameworks, as well as broader issues of museum practice and museology. The term of the fellowship in the Busch-Reisinger Museum is 22-months, beginning no later than September 4, 2012. Summer start date strongly preferred. The Museums are currently undergoing a major renovation and access to the collection may be limited during this term.
Basic Qualifications MA and graduate training in art history or related field required, Ph.D. past qualifying paper preferred. Candidates for the fellowship must be European citizens.
 
 

Tainted Goods: Contemporary Sculpture and the Critique of Display Cultures in Germany and Europe 

York University
May 10-11, 2012
Among the most challenging of contemporary art practices are sculptures that comprise sprawling accumulations of objects. The purpose of this conference is to investigate this practice. Straying from the cultures of monumentality, cutting-edge technologies, and crowd-pleasing spectacles associated with the globalized industry of “installation art,” the sculptural works of particular concern in “Tainted Goods” subvert display cultures by provoking viewing experiences that are neither seamless nor easily consumed. This seemingly tainted array of imagery and materials—often things literally left on the side of the road according to the relentless logic and progress of the capitalist machine—are combined in ways that allow each element to retain a degree of empirical specificity. There are gaps between images and referents that create the potential for a crossing of semantic switches or a perceptual friction that generates cognitive sparks and insights. While the artistic materials tend to be fragmentary and are juxtaposed with other items that initially may seem incompatible, in the end, they “say” nothing with communicative clarity. This “materialist” approach to art-making may interpreted with the aid of remarkably different aesthetic and philosophical approaches, from those rooted in Frankfurt School notions of the dialectical image to those grounded in the thinking of Gilles Deleuze or Manuel de Landa, to name only a few.
Conference participants will reflect on the experience of specific artworks and exhibitions. We wish to maintain an emphasis on exploring the forms and the aesthetic demands placed on the viewer of such “tainted” sculptural works. We seek to develop a broader range of aesthetic models through which these sculptures can be understood to function critically, whether as commentaries on capitalist or communist economies, as anthropologies of everyday life, as critiques of the practices of museum collecting and interpretation, as twisted replications of sales strategies from advertising, stores, and television shopping networks, or as surrenders to the psychologies of accumulation, be they sumptuous pleasure, emotional displacement, or pathologized hoarding behavior. The works treated in “Tainted Goods” perform their critique of display cultures through the stark juxtaposition of artistic and non-artistic materials that have not been permitted to blend seamlessly into a coherent compositional whole that may be consumed or marketed with ease.
http://taintedgoods.info.yorku.ca/conference-may-11-2012-york-university/
 
 


EXHIBITION ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Critique and Crisis. Art in Europe since 1945

30th Council of Europe Art Exhibition
An exhibition of the German Historical Museum
Curator: Prof. Dr. Monika Flacke
The exhibition “Critique and Crisis” is an initial attempt to take a look at European art since 1945 without the usual ideological demarcation lines that came about with the Cold War. Twelve chapters will examine the different ways in which artists have dealt with the ideals of Enlightenment and the belief in universal human rights, freedom, equality and democracy. Selected works will be seen within the framework of the project as visual expressions of ideas and concepts that have the potential to change the world. The artworks come from almost all of the European countries – from Portugal to Russia, from Scotland to Albania and Greece. Thus the exhibition also taps into the art of often neglected regions of Europe and in this way overcomes the separation of art into East and West, North and South, which has been a common practice since the Cold War. National background of the artists, chronologies and artistic schools do not play a role.
The exhibition is the centrepiece of an international cooperation, coordinated by the German Historical Museum, in which ten museums, galleries, research and cultural institutes from Germany, Poland, Estonia, Italy, Croatia, Serbia, the Czech Republic, Greek, Schweden and Hungary are participating. Besides the exhibition, which will travel from Berlin to Warsaw, Tallinn and Milan, further individual aspects will be presented in smaller satellite exhibitions as well as in the context of workshops and conferences.
Accompanying the exhibition will be an extensive catalogue as well as a bilingual German-English publication that will most likely also be translated into the languages of the exhibition’s further stations. An interactive website dealing with the project as a whole and a closing conference will round off the wide range of individual projects.
http://www.dhm.de/ENGLISH/ausstellungen/
 
 

Groupe Signe 1971–1974

Nouveau Musée National de Monaco

21 April–17 June 2012
The Nouveau Musée National de Monaco presents its latest exhibition, Groupe Signe 1971–1974 which will be held at Villa Paloma, NMNM from April 21st to June 17th 2012.
The Groupe Signe is a group of artists created post-1968 in Monaco, led by the painters Claude Rosticher and Roland Marghieri and the photographers Michel Cresp and Pierre Lequien. They acted collectively between 1971 and 1974 in reaction to advertising and social conformity through iconoclastic actions leading to the creation of more poetic worlds.
http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/groupe-signe-1971%E2%80%931974/